...[A] remarkably consistent and high-powered aesthetic
— palatinate, on DUCFS 2018

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Statement

Designer: In Dodd We Trust

Models: Felix Saro-Wiwa, Pauli Soravia, Louis Sheppard, Nina Stevens, Rose Harman, Charlotte Frazer, Ted Lavis-Coward, Luke Thompson, Joey Yip

Photographers: Alasdair Harris and Maddie Flisher

Videographer: Jack Dobson

Creative Direction: Jemima Bunbury

In rejection of the mass-production and trend-led design of the fast fashion industry, DUCFS instead seeks to promote original design and the expression of individual style. The epitome of this can be seen in designs by In Dodd We Trust; upcycling and customising vintage garments. In an exclusive collaboration with "In Dodd We Trust", DUCFS models were able to design garments to their own specifications, making for truly original and personal creations. Self-styled and with minimal creative direction, this shoot hopes to communicate the value of sartorial self-expression and the communicative potential of your personal style.

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THE SHIFT

Designer: Edge O’ Beyond

Models: Mia Macdermott, Sophie Davies

Photographers: Alasdair Harris, Maddie Flisher

Creative Direction: Pippa Tatton- Brown, Illona Phillips, Jemima Bunbury

MUA: Emma Reeves

Location: Kindred Studios

With thanks to artists Rosanna Gardner, Kiran Vaswani, Margaret Hyde and Diane Milner for use of their studio

The time has come for a serious shift in attitudes. The pace of the current fast fashion industry is unsustainable. We must slow down, breathe and celebrate those who create conscientiously and consider the impact of the clothes they produce. Founded by London College of Fashion graduate Naomi De Haan, Edge O’ Beyond is a young British brand that produces luxury lingerie, combining gilt-threaded French embroidery and bondage-inspired strapping. We take Edge O’Beyond to the creative space that is Kindred Studios in northwest London, to strip back the excesses of fast fashion.

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#PULLTHETHREAD T-SHIRT

Christmas is a time when consumerism is at it’s peak. To encourage a more sustainable festive season, we have now teamed up with charityshirts.co.uk for a second release of the #pullthethread T-shirts, this time long-sleeved. ALL proceeds from the first 100 sold before the end of December will be donated to EJF, so get your loved ones a present with a purpose this year.

https://www.charityshirts.co.uk/products/durham-university-charity-fashion-show-t-shirt

Designed by Ilona Phillips

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THE COVER UP

Designer: Aleksandra Seweryniak

Models: Ross Moldavsky, Goedele Jules Mangelaars, Elsa Eglin

Photographer: Alasdair Harriss

Creative Direction: Jemima Bunbury

Makeup Artist: Tsara Crosfill Morton

Seweryniak’s sensual and voluptuous tailored pieces are contrasted against the harsh rigidity of the industrial North East. Behind the façade of the fashion industry, glossy magazine covers and aspirational imagery lies an environmental devastation habitually hidden from the consumer, alongside significant exploitation of human rights in third world countries. Pristine, stylised and clean-cut images which juxtapose a reality of muddied waters surrounding material sourcing, unethical employment contracts and perilous waste disposal. Our environmental security has never been so pertinent to ensuring a sustainable future, or indeed a future at all.

End The Cover Up and #pullthethread

Durham University Charity Fashion Show - DUCFS proudly supports the Environmental Justice Foundation

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/ejf-ducfs

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THE CRASH

Designer: Archives Archives

Model: Charlie Spence Creative Direction: Jemima Bunbury

Photographer: Alasdair Harriss

With 75% of clothing purchases made at discounted purchases, the fashion industry has situated itself within the parameters of precarious functionality. Prices are being driven lower and lower; quality control has been sidelined. This relentlessly accelerating production wheel and the overwhelming effect of ever evolving trends and novel designs is unsustainable. The humanitarian and environmental crisis we are in must change public discourse on the detrimental effects of the fashion industry, or the inevitable result will be The Crash.

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CONSUMERISM

Designer: George Clarke

Photographer: Maddie Flisher

Videographer: Jack Dobson

Creative Direction: Jemima Bunbury

Models: Luke Thomson, Oscar Noble , Holly Orchard

Makeup Artist: Tsara Crosfill Morton

Location: HiYoU Oriental Food Emporium

George Clarke’s GEC collection gives attitude to the pervasive cultural attitude that is consumerism. Featured at London’s GFW and recontextualised at HiYoU Oriental Food Emporium, his collection of tailored denim seeks to subvert our understanding of the denim industry today, giving foresight into its future.

Overwhelming and universal branding pervade our subconscious. Our models are illuminated by his visionary exaggerated tailoring, silhouetted against harsh fluorescent lighting and the inundation of logos, messages and taglines of consumer goods.

Through our support of the Environmental Justice Foundation we are calling for a fashion industry that expresses our values rather than polluting our planet.

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/ejf-ducfs #pullthethread

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BRANDED

Photographer: Ed Little

Model: Ella Clouston

Makeup: Emma Reeve

Creative Direction: Jemima Bunbury and Ilona Phillips

An explosion of monograms, logos and branded typography have recently taken over the fashion world. This photoshoot explores the aesthetics of branding, and its communicative power.

Branding functions as a form of social currency. We buy certain brands to align ourselves with the images and lifestyles attached.

The ‘brand personalities’ we aspire to have all been carefully crafted by PR and marketing teams throughout their campaigns. These marketing messages are designed to drive us to consume, rather than choose the styles that best express our character.

But branding can be used to express in a powerful way. By aligning ourselves to brands which reflect our values, we can use our consumer spending power to support innovative brands who create consciously and ethically.

The temporary tattoos used in this photoshoot visually explore how branding is presented, and how the individual can use it to foster, or even create, a more personal image.